The funny (or not so funny) thing about wearing a turban is that it makes you realize how judgmental the world is. And I’m sure you (without exception) are a part of it. You never caught yourself judging people only because they’re wearing something you dislike or you’re not used to? We are all judgmental.

Turban Fashion – T(h)urban(s)day

Turban Fashion – T(h)urban(s)day

I started to pay attention not only on how people react to me wearing a turban. But I also started to listen more to how they were talking about each other & how they’re only focused on looks. I realized we call people stupid or smart, sophisticated or primitive without knowing them. We just look at them. That’s already enough to call them names. Or to laugh about them even. And I’ll be honest – I am no exception here. I also judge and build my opinion on what people look like. I want to be free in every way but how can I be when I judge others based on their looks? I can find excuses for it. Of course. I’m a visual person. I love the esthetics. Fashion is important for me. We are all humans. Human make mistakes… But when I think of it from a yogic point of view (knowing that a lot of yogis are not much better…) all I can say, man, this is sad.

We judge religious people for covering their hair/head. We judge people for being fat. We judge people for being too thin. We judge people for wearing all white. We judge people for wearing all black. We judge people for being too colorful. We judge people in suits. People in suits judge people in training suits. People in training suits judge hipsters for looking all the same. They again judge people for wearing no brands. People wearing no brands judge others for showing off their expensive clothes. People who wear expensive clothes judge people buying their stuff in the market. People in the market judge the sellers for their women being veiled. The veiled women judge unveiled women. And it goes on and on and on…

Don’t tell me you can’t relate to any of these! (and I’m here only focusing on the looks. I’m not even mentioning racial or cultural differences and judgments they bring with it)

Lady on the street in Zurich – T(h)urban(s)day

Lady on the street in Zurich – T(h)urban(s)day

I think we can all agree that we all want nothing but freedom. But the truth is: we can’t have freedom if we don’t stop judging the other for using their freedom to be what they want to be and to wear what they want to wear. I would love to walk in my hood with my dog and my turban on and not to get so many confused looks from my Dutch neighbors thinking, shit, something went wrong with this girl or the Muslim people in my hood thinking, a white girl with turban walks the dog… this must be the end of the world… I know I shouldn’t pay attention to all of this. You wouldn’t think it, but I can be very insecure sometimes…

I wish I could only write about the fashionable aspects of turbans, because it would be more of a light read, more digestible. Sorry, but yoga teaches me to look inwards and when making the effort of writing about the beauty of turbans, I can’t help but to really take a look in that mirror while I’m winding my turban.

My turban experiment goes on. Though I don’t wear it on a daily basis anymore. Sometimes I just miss the wind in my hair. To be honest the other reason is: sometimes I don’t feel strong enough to withstand the pressure of the looks. But when I do feel strong, I definitely look like one of these women in the pictures… :)